Tuesday, January 25, 2011

pantorium

3/4 oz Gin (Cascade Mountain)
3/4 oz Benedictine
3/4 oz St. Germain
3/4 oz Lime Juice
1 dash Angostura Bitters

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.

On Tuesday night, I had to juice a lime for the curry recipe I was making so I went off in search of a recipe that would make good use of the rest. In the Cocktail Collective book, I spotted a recipe by Jabriel Donohue from the Acadia restaurant in Portland, Oregon. Jabriel's drink, the Pantorium, had a familiar format of a base spirit, two liqueurs, and citrus; however, the name was quirky and catching. Pantorium is an old school term for a laundry and cleaners and some establishments still exist under this name. I could not neither locate a Pantorium in Portland nor determine the full history of why the drink is named this (and Jabriel himself did not provide many clues).
For me, the Pantorium possessed a spicy and floral nose, while for Andrea, the drink reminded her of grapefruit. The sip was sweet from the liqueurs balanced with the sour of the crisp lime. A parallel counter balance occurred in the swallow with the brighter notes of St. Germain being followed by the darker ones of Benedictine and Angostura Bitters. This combination reminded me of the way Galliano and Benedictine played together in Josey Packard's Winifred Banks with the latter liqueur playing playing the bass notes and the former the melody. In addition, the lime and St. Germain flavors complemented each other; however, the lime lacked enough drying power for me and the balance ended up on the sweeter side of what I generally prefer (but not unreasonably so).
Post note: Jabriel Donohue commented here and explained all:
The story of the Pantorium: a while back I was talking with the the owner of an establishment that never ended up coming into existence. While we were discussing how to build out a quality cocktail menu, he mentioned that he wanted two drinks with specific names. The first was completely onomatopoeic and I can't recall it for the life of me. The second he wanted to be called "Pantorium". He wasn't even sure what the word meant, but it was printed in tile out front of a nearby business (which had, I found after a little research, once been a dry cleaners). I'm a sucker for "make this name" cocktail challenges, and so this was the drink created, intended to be "pants-cleaningly refreshing". Thanks for trying it out, I'm glad you liked it!

2 comments:

Glass Playground Productions said...

The story of the Pantorium: a while back I was talking with the the owner of an establishment that never ended up coming into existence. While we were discussing how to build out a quality cocktail menu, he mentioned that he wanted two drinks with specific names. The first was completely onomatopoeic and I can't recall it for the life of me. The second he wanted to be called "Pantorium". He wasn't even sure what the word meant, but it was printed in tile out front of a nearby business (which had, I found after a little research, once been a dry cleaners). I'm a sucker for "make this name" cocktail challenges, and so this was the drink created, intended to be "pants-cleaningly refreshing".

Thanks for trying it out, I'm glad you liked it!

-Jabriel Donohue

frederic said...

Thank you for the story! My google search did pull up a photo of a pantorium tile mosaic (along with a bunch of existent pantoriums and old ads for them).