Thursday, September 16, 2021

the bowery

2 oz Rye Whiskey (Rittenhouse Bonded)
1/2 oz Amontillado Sherry (Lustau)
1/4 oz Amaro Ramazzotti
1/4 oz Apricot Liqueur (Rothman & Winter)

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe pre-rinsed with absinthe (Copper & Kings), and garnish with an orange twist.
Two Fridays ago, I recalled how I saw Rachel at Backbar making Eric Alperin's Skid Row as a bartender's whim, and I was inspired to riff on it. I swapped the Genever for rye, kept the Ramazzotti and apricot liqueur, and supplemented the notes with sherry and absinthe. For a name, I dubbed this one the Bowery after one of the historical skid rows in Manhattan. Here, the Bowery gave forth an orange, dried apricot, and anise nose. Next, malt, grape, and dried fruit on the sip led into rye, nutty, and bitter apricot flavors on the swallow with an anise finish.

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

the smoking man

2 oz Irish Whiskey (Teeling Small Batch)
1 oz Bittered Sweet Vermouth (Punt e Mes)
1 bsp Cinnamon Syrup

Stir with ice and strain into a rocks glass pre-rinsed with Islay Scotch (Caol Ila).
Two Wednesdays ago, I turned to Chad Austin's Everyone Has a F*cking Cocktail Book and spotted the Manhattah riff called the Smoking Man. The text declares that it is an The X-Files reference, and the show's Wikipedia described how, "The Cigarette Smoking Man is a fictional character and one of the primary antagonists of the American science fiction drama television series The X-Files. He serves as the arch-nemesis of FBI Special Agent Fox Mulder." Despite my not having seen an episode with him in it that I can recall, I set to mixing. In the glass, the Smoking Man showcased a medicinal-peaty smoke and plum aroma. Next, a grape sip uncovered Irish whiskey, cinnamon, and bitter herbal flavors on the swallow.

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

explorer's negroni

3/4 oz Batavia Arrack (Von Oosten)
3/4 oz Mezcal (Mezcal Union)
1 oz Campari
1 oz Sweet Vermouth (Noilly Prat)
2 dash Absinthe (1 scant bsp Kübler)

Stir with ice, strain into an Old Fashioned glass with ice, and garnish with an orange twist.

Two Tuesdays ago, someone made my Explorer's Dream and posted that riff on the Poet's Dream on Instagram. Therefore, I revisited the combination and wondered what else the Batavia Arrack-mezcal duo for gin would work in. The classic I went with was the Negroni, and I kept the absinthe from the Explorer's Dream for it worked great with Campari and sweet vermouth in the Quill.
The Explorer's Negroni discovered an orange, funk, and hint of smoke on the nose. Next, a dark berry on the sip reminded me of sloe gin, and the swallow landed with funky spirits melding into bitter orange flavors with anise accents.

Monday, September 13, 2021

attorney privilege

2 oz Bourbon (Larceny)
1/2 oz Orgeat
2 dash Angostura Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with a lemon twist.
Two Mondays ago, I spotted a reference to Erick Castro's Attorney Privilege published in Imbibe Magazine in 2012. The recipe that he crafted at Polite Provisions in San Diego reminded me of a Bourbon Japanese Cocktail, so I decided to give it a try. The Attorney Privilege proffered a lemon, earthy, and almond aroma. Next, a creamy sip led into Bourbon, nutty, allspice, and clove flavors on the swallow.

Sunday, September 12, 2021

death & taxes

1 oz Blended Scotch (Famous Grouse)
1 oz Gin (Barr Hill)
3/4 oz Sweet Vermouth (Noilly Prat)
1/4 oz Benedictine
2 dash Orange Bitters (Angostura Orange)

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with a lemon twist.
Two Sundays ago, I was intrigued by a recipe that I had spotted in Imbibe Magazine called Death & Taxes. It was crafted by Michael Madrusan of the Everleigh in Melbourne when he was at Milk & Honey in New York City. The combination reminded me of the classic Automobile Cocktail with Benedictine or the Butcher Cocktail with Benedictine and orange bitters, so it intrigued me. Here, the Death & Taxes offered up unavoidable lemon, malt, and grape aromas to the nose. Next, grape and plum notes led into juniper, Scotch, and herbal flavors on the swallow.

Saturday, September 11, 2021

cure's boulevardier

1 oz Rittenhouse Bonded Rye
1 oz Punt e Mes
1 oz Campari

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with an orange twist.
Two Saturdays ago, I spied on Kindred Cocktails the house recipe for the 1930s Boulevardier at Cure in New Orleans that they came up with in 2009. With bonded rye and Punt e Mes for the Bourbon and sweet vermouth, it seemed novel enough to give it a whirl. This variation on the Boulevardier welcomed the nose with orange, grape, and plum aromas. Next, grape and nectarine notes on the sip ventured into rye and Punt e Mes' rounded bitter notes leading into Campari's bitter orange flavors on the swallow.

Friday, September 10, 2021

doberman

1 1/2 oz Bourbon (Four Roses)
1/2 oz Fernet Branca
1/2 oz Benedictine
1/2 oz Sweet Vermouth (Noilly Prat)

Stir with ice, strain into a Nick & Nora glass, and garnish with a lemon twist.
Two Fridays ago, I spotted on Kindred Cocktails the Doberman that was sourced from The Bartender's Choice app. The recipe was ceated by David Molyneux at The Everleigh in Melbourne, Australia, in 2018, and the combination reminded me the Problem Solver, 4 Devils, and perhaps the Down & Brown. Once assembled, the Doberman charged at the nose with lemon oil and menthol notes. Next, a caramel and grape sip lunged into a Bourbon, minty, menthol, and herbal swallow.

Thursday, September 9, 2021

henry's dream

3/4 oz Rhum Agricole (Rhum Clement Premiere Canne)
3/4 oz Mezcal (Mezcal Union)
1/2 oz Punt e Mes
1/2 oz Cynar
1/2 oz Apricot Liqueur (Rothman & Winter)

Stir with ice and strain into an old fashioned glass.

Two Thursday ago, I decided to tinker and continue on with my rhum agricole-mezcal stirred drinks that started with Up Jumped the Devil and followed by Stranger than Kindness. This time I went with the Cynar-apricot duo that I learned to appreciate in the One One Thousand, and I utilized Punt e Mes to bolster the fruity and bitter notes. For a name, I kept with the Nick Cave song titles concept with Henry's Dream.
Henry's Dream conjured up apricot, smoke, and dark funk aromas to the nose. Next, caramel and orchard fruit on the sip aroused grassy, vegetal, and bitter-fruity flavors on the swallow.

Wednesday, September 8, 2021

[the sgarallino]

2 oz Angel's Envy Bourbon
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Honey Syrup
1/4 oz Meletti Amaro

Shake with ice and strain into a rocks glass with a large ice cube.

Two Wednesdays ago, I stopped into Backbar during my brand work with Angel's Envy. There, I found a seat in front of Rachel Kopelman, and I asked her for a bartender's whim using said spirit. She returned with a Gold Rush riff containing Meletti Amaro akin to the Without a Trace that utilized Amaro Nonino. For a name, I dubbed this one the Sgarallino after Andrea Sgarallino who was part of the Italian wave of immigrants who partook in the '49ers gold rush in California. Sgarallino was rather successful there, and he brought back his gold and money collected from the community to help fund the Italian Revolution that united the country in the early 1860s.
The drink began with a Bourbon, lemon, and floral bouquet. Next, lemon, honey, and caramel on the sip gave way to Bourbon, floral, and bitter herbal flavors on the swallow with Meletti's violet flower note working elegantly with the honey here.

Tuesday, September 7, 2021

kingston negroni

1 oz Smith & Cross Rum
1 oz Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth (Noilly Prat)
1 oz Campari

Stir with ice, strain into an old fashioned glass with ice, and garnish with an orange twist.

After having made the Pineapple Kingston Negroni the night before, I was reminded that I have never written up the original. An Aperol riff, the Kingston Contessa, created at Eastern Standard as a take on No. 9 Park's Contessa, was the closest thing that I could refer to. Therefore, I sought out the recipe crafted by Joaquin Simo in the Death & Co. Cocktail Book; in 2009, Haus Alpenz's Eric Seed handed Joaquin the newly launched Smith & Cross Rum bottle, and this came about five minutes later. It was a simple Mr. Potato Head technique of this high ester rum in place of the gin. He attributed the success of the combination in Punch Drinks as, "Smith & Cross is no shrinking violet, so it stands up to the bombastic chocolate and bitter orange notes in the vermouth while drying out the Campari's richness and tempering its bitterness. Further evidence that less can sometimes be quite a bit more."
The Kingston Negroni began with orange oil over rum funk aromas. Next, the sweet vermouth's grape filled the sip, and the swallow followed through with funky rum, bitter orange, and dark berry flavors.

Monday, September 6, 2021

pineapple kingston negroni

1 oz Appleton Signature Rum
1 oz Stiggin's Fancy Pineapple Rum
3/4 oz Sweet Vermouth (Noilly Prat)
3/4 oz Campari

Stir with ice, strain into an old fashioned glass with a large ice cube, and garnish with an orange twist.
Two Mondays ago, I uncovered Paul McGee and Shelby Allison's riff on Joaquin Simo's Kingston Negroni. Their drink was the Pineapple Kingston Negroni that they crafted at Chicago's Lost Lake and got published in Imbibe Magazine in January of 2020. Instead of taking a funky route with Smith & Cross rum, the duo opted for a tamer Jamaican rum with Appleton Signature and supplemented with fruity notes from Stiggin's Fancy Pineapple Rum. Once prepared, the Pineapple Kingston Negroni proffered orange, pineapple, and berry aromas to the nose. Next, grape and cherry on the sip twisted into rum, caramel, and bitter pineapple-orange flavors on the swallow.

Sunday, September 5, 2021

jacques & doris

1 1/4 oz Blended Scotch (Famous Grouse)
3/4 oz Laphroaig Scotch
3/8 oz Sirop JM (*)
4 dash Peychaud's Bitters
1 dash Lavender Bitters (Scrappy's)

Stir with ice, strain into an old fashioned glass pre-rinsed with Suze, and garnish with grapefruit oil from a twist.
(*) 2:1 Demerara syrup will work in a pinch.
Two Sundays ago, I reached for Carey Jones' Brooklyn Bartender book and spotted the Jacques & Doris. This Sazerac riff was crafted by Tyler Caffall at Fort Defiance circa 2015; the presence of Suze reminded me of other Sazerac riffs such as the La Tour Eiffel and Goldenback but here it was in the rinse instead of acting as a sweetener. The Jacques & Doris began with a grapefruit oil, earthy-herbal gentian, and peat smoke aroma. Next, a malt-laden sip gave way to smoky Scotch, lavender, and anise flavors with hints of gentian from the rinse on the swallow.

Saturday, September 4, 2021

linden square

2 oz Rittenhouse Rye
1/2 oz Amaro Nonino
1/2 oz Aperol
1/2 oz Sweet Vermouth (Noilly Prat)
1 dash Bittermens Mole Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, and garnish with an orange twist.

Two Saturdays ago, I searched for recipes on Kindred Cocktails created at Eastern Standard that I might never have tried. The one that caught my attention was the Linden Square by Bobby McCoy as a 2010 update to the Red Carpet that we published here in 2008. Bobby reduced the liqueur amounts and added in sweet vermouth and mole bitters. The duo of Amaro Nonino and Aperol are best known for being partners in the Paper Plane, but they also do well in citrus-free drinks like the Marchessa. In addition, there is no indication as to whether the name refers to the neighborhood in Wellesley, Massachusetts, similar to how his Wildwood was a tribute to his old street.
The Linden Square gave forth an orange, caramel, and rye aroma. Next, grape and orange on the sip developed into whiskey and dark orange flavors on the swallow. Overall, the Linden Square's swallow and finish reminded me a bit of the Liberal.

Friday, September 3, 2021

the boardroom

2 oz Cognac (Pierre Ferrand Ambre)
3/4 oz Amaro Nonino
1/4 oz Walnut Liqueur (Russo Nocino)
2 dash Abbott's Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, and garnish with orange oil from a twist and either a cherry or walnut (cherry).
Two Fridays ago, I was perusing the Kindred Cocktails database when I spotted the Boardroom by New York City bartender Rafa Garcia Febles circa 2014. I was lured in by this Cognac Black Manhattan of sorts by the combination of Amaro Nonino and walnut liqueur that I had tried before in the Royal Union and Rock and a Hard Place. Once stirred and strained, the Boardroom presented an orange oil, dark orange, and Cognac aroma to the nose. Next, caramel-orange notes on the sip circled back to Cognac, dark orange, walnut, clove, and spice flavors on the swallow. Overall, the balance of the drink reminded me of Nicole Lebedevitch's Ce Soir that she created at the Hawthorne.

Thursday, September 2, 2021

great silence

1 oz Mezcal (Mezcal Union)
1 oz Lime Juice
3/4 oz Campari
1/2 oz Orgeat
2-3 dash Luxardo Maraschino (1/8 oz)

Shake with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, and garnish with a spiral cut lime twist.

Two Thursdays ago, I delved into the June 2021 article in Imbibe Magazine on Maraschino liqueur. The recipe that called out to me was a shaken mezcal number crafted by Isaac Shumway at California Gold in San Rafael, California called the Great Silence. Given how Campari-orgeat works great in the Pinwheel Swizzle, Maraschino-orgeat in the Gallivanting in Golden Gai, and Campari-Maraschino in the Carnivale, this recipe seemed to do no wrong.
The Great Silence conjured up lime, mezcal, and grapefruit aromas. Next, a creamy lime and orange sip lulled into mezcal and bitter grapefruit flavors on the swallow.

Wednesday, September 1, 2021

the problem solver

2 oz Overproof Rye (Rittenhouse Bonded)
1/2 oz Cherry Herring
1/4 oz Benedictine
1/4 oz Fernet Branca

Stir with ice, strain into a double old fashioned glass with ice, and garnish with an orange twist.
Two Wednesdays, I decided to make a recipe that Jabriel Donohue posted on his Facebook that he created over a decade ago at the Acadia in Portland and now serves at the Doctor's Office in Seattle called the Problem Solver. Since Fernet works well with both Benedictine and Cherry Heering, I was excited to give this one a go. Moreover, it reminded me a little of a Remember the Maine crossed with a Down & Brown. In the glass, the Problem Solver proffered an orange, rye, and cherry aroma to the nose. Next, a cherry-grape sip concluded with a rye, cherry, and bitter menthol swallow.

call me old fashioned

2 oz Angel's Envy Bourbon
3/4 oz Amaro Montenegro
1/4 oz Cinnamon Syrup
2 dash Fee's Black Walnut Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into a rocks glass with ice, and garnish with an orange twist.
Two Wednesdays ago, my brand work with Angel's Envy brought me to JM Curley in the Downtown Crossing neighborhood of Boston. For one of my drinks, I asked bar manager Katie Soule for an Old Fashioned or a variation thereof. She whipped up one of her creations that had appeared on a previous menu named Call Me Old Fashioned. The combination of Bourbon, Amaro Montenegro, and cinnamon syrup reminded me of the Battle Annie that I had in New York right before quarantine, so I was excited about the drink before it even hit my lips. Overall, this combination made for a great harbinger of Autumn in a glass.