Sunday, June 20, 2021

el camino

1 oz Mezcal (Fidencio)
1 oz Rye Whiskey (Redemption)
1/2 oz Benedictine
4 dash Peychaud's Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into an old fashioned glass with a large ice cube, and garnish with an orange twist.

Two Sundays ago, I was perusing the Kindred Cocktails database when I spotted the El Camino that was published in a 2015 issue of Imbibe Magazine. The drink was created at the Chestnut Club in Santa Monica, California, and it reminded me of the Don Lockwood that I had mixed up the night before. The combination of a smoky and a non-smoky spirit joined together by Benedictine and Peychaud's reminded me of Death & Co.'s Shruff's End.
The El Camino began with an orange, smoke, anise, and vegetal-herbal aroma. Next, a rich, slightly caramel sip drove into rye, smoke, herbal, and bitter cherry flavors on the swallow with a dry finish.

Saturday, June 19, 2021

don lockwood

1 oz Rainwater Madeira (1 1/2 oz Blandy's 5 Year Verdelho)
1/2 oz Bourbon (3/4 oz Old Grand-Dad 114°)
1/2 oz Benedictine (3/4 oz)
1 dash Peychaud's Bitters (2 light dash)

Stir with ice, strain into a rocks glass with a large cube, and garnish with a lemon twist.

Two Saturdays ago, I returned to T. Cole Newton's Cocktail Dive Bar and spotted the Don Lockwood which in name and Bourbon component only reminded me of the one created at Dutch Kills. This one was crafted by Cole for the Orpheum Theater in New Orleans, and he similarly named it after Gene Kelly's character in Singin' in the Rain. The combination of Madeira and Benedictine was alluring for it worked rather well in the Prospector, and I had success with it in the Provocateur and Undercover Angel.
The Don Lockwood proffered a lemon oil and grape bouquet. Next, grape and a light caramel note on the sip danced into Bourbon, oxidized fruit, and herbal flavors on the swallow with a lightly anise finish.

Friday, June 18, 2021

canongate

1 1/2 oz Scotch (Royal Brakla 12 Year)
1 1/2 oz Aperol
1/2 oz Punt e Mes
1/2 oz Walnut Liqueur (Rosso Nocino)

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, and garnish with a cherry.

Two Fridays ago, I removed a book from my computer desk and uncovered a note highlighting the interactions of Aperol, walnut liqueur, and Cynar. The duo of Aperol and walnut has worked great together in the Old Money and Mr. Burgess, and that got me thinking to one of my favorite nutty-Aperol combinations in the Prospect Park with Maraschino as the nutty component. Therefore, I made my riff subbing in walnut liqueur for the Maraschino and swapping the spirit to Scotch to complement the walnut element such as in the Storm King. For a name, I dubbed this one after a historic neighborhood in Edinburgh, Scotland.
The Canongate proffered a Scotch and nutty cherry bouquet to the nose. Next, grape, roast, and fruity notes on the sip shot into whisky, walnut, and bitter orange flavors on the swallow.

Thursday, June 17, 2021

the goblins turned to stone

1 1/2 oz Genever (Bols)
3/4 oz Cardamaro
1/2 oz Cynar
1/4 oz Curaçao (Pierre Ferrand Dry)

Stir with ice, strain into a coupe glass, and garnish with an orange twist.

Two Thursdays ago, I was still inspired by the Cynar-curaçao combination after having last tinkered with it in the Prelude to a Broken Arm. I thought about how well Genever works with each such as in the Sherry Duval and Red Light, and I thus selected it as a base spirit. For a fourth component, I opted for Cardamaro which melds well with Genever such as in the Herbivore.
For a name, I selected the Goblins Turned to Stone from a collection of Dutch fairy tales. Here, it showcased orange and malty aromas. Next, grape, caramel, and malt on the sip transformed into malt wine, herbal, orange, and minty notes on the swallow.

Wednesday, June 16, 2021

bail out

1 1/2 oz Bourbon (Four Roses Yellow)
1/2 oz Benedictine
1/2 oz Honey Syrup
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
2 dash Allspice Dram (1 bsp Hamilton's)

Shake with ice, strain into a rocks glass with ice, and garnish with a lemon twist.

Two Wednesdays ago, I opened up T. Cole Newton's Cocktail Dive Bar and spotted the Bail Out that he created at Coquette in New Orleans in 2008 and named after the economic news headlines that year. The combination made me think of the Honeymoon Cocktail until I remembered that was Benedictine and curaçao instead of honey (honey in the name only). However, I have had that duo of Benedictine and honey before in drinks like the Fecamp 500 and Jitterbug Sour and have utilized in my aperitif French Film at Loyal Nine.
The Bail Out approached with a lemon and honey bouquet. Next, lemon, malt, and honey on the sip led into Bourbon, herbal, and allspice flavors on the swallow. Interestingly, the drink came across like a mashup of a Gold Rush and a Frisco Sour which was the opposite of times that needed a bail out.

Tuesday, June 15, 2021

fall back

2 oz Bourbon (Angel's Envy)
1/4 oz Nux Alpina Walnut Liqueur
1/4 oz Maple Syrup
1 dash Mole Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into an old fashioned glass with ice, and garnish with orange oil from a twist.
Two Tuesdays ago, Andrea and I ventured down to Backbar for some drinks and snacks. While I was expecting their "Backbear" bear-themed menu, that was not finished yet, so they offered up a menu of house classics from the last 10 years. While I started with the Model T from the inaugural menu, I selected the Fall Back (made with Angel's Envy Bourbon) as my second round (here spelled with a space as opposed to the Fallback from Sasha Petraske's book). The recipe was crafted by opening bartender Bryn Tattan sometime in the opening year of 2012 (I am guessing in the autumn of that year) as an Old Fashioned riff. In the glass, the Fall Back provided beautiful maple and walnut accents to the Bourbon finished in port casks and made for a delightful tipple.

Monday, June 14, 2021

book of lies

2 oz Sweet Vermouth (Cocchi)
3/4 oz Zacapa 23 Rum
1/4 oz Smith & Cross Rum

Build in a single old fashioned glass, give a quick stir, garnish with orange oil from a twist, and serve room temperature.
Two Mondays ago, I pulled the Jupiter Disco: Preservation zine out of the frequently used book pile and spied the Book of Lies. This drink was crafted by Al Sotack in 2013 at the Franklin Mortgage & Investment Co. as a reverse (room temperature) Rum Manhattan utilizing the duo of Zacapa for richness and Smith & Cross for funk that I have seen work in the Frau Holle and Desk Job. Once prepared, the Book of Lies opened with an orange and caramel aroma. Next, grape, caramel, and plum notes on the sip offered up funky rum, raisin, and orange flavors on the swallow.

Sunday, June 13, 2021

the frontier

3/4 oz Redemption Rye (Templeton)
3/4 oz Amaro Nonino
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Krogstad Aquavit
1/2 oz Demerara Syrup

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail coupe.
Two Sundays ago, I turned to the Hawthorne bar bible where I spotted the Frontier. This citrus drink featured the pairing of rye whiskey and aquavit that I have enjoyed before in the Carra-Ryed Away, Immigrant Song, and Ask & Embla. In the glass, the Frontier offered up a caraway, lemon, and star anise aroma to the nose. Next, lemon and caramel on the sip traveled to rye, caraway, herbal, and anise flavors on the swallow.

Saturday, June 12, 2021

prelude to a broken arm

1 oz Cognac (Pierre Ferrand Ambre)
1/2 oz Rhum Agricole Blanc (Clement)
1/2 oz Curaçao (Pierre Ferrand Dry)
1/2 oz Cynar
1/2 oz Lemon Juice

Shake with ice, strain into a sugar-rimmed coupe, and garnish with a lemon twist.

Two Saturdays ago, my recent writing about the Undertaker reminded me of the curaçao-Cynar combination, and that got me thinking of the Hugo Ball from 2009 that perhaps introduced me to the combination. For a direction, I opted for a Sidecar styling with some rhum agricole to keep things French and a little bit weird. Since Hugo Ball was a member of the Dada art scene, I made this a tribute to a Marcel Duchamp piece that is merely a snow shovel signed and dated by the artist; it was part of his "ready-made" series of manufactured goods that were "elevated to the dignity of a work of art by the mere choice of an artist."
The Prelude to a Broken Arm met the senses with a lemon, orange, Cognac, and caramel bouquet. Next, lemon and caramel on the sip flowed into Cognac, grassy rhum, and funky orange flavors on the swallow.

Friday, June 11, 2021

two orchard thieves

1 1/2 oz Laird's 7 1/2 Year Apple Brandy (Laird's Bonded)
3/4 oz Bols Genever
1/2 oz Luxardo Maraschino
1/4 oz Cynar

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with grated cardamom.

Two Fridays ago, I happened upon a drink entered into Kindred Cocktails by Misty Kalkofen called the Two Orchard Thieves. She created this split spirit number at Drink in 2010, and it appeared in a 2011 Boston.com article. The apple brandy-Genever combination is one that has worked well in Yvonne's Toronto and A Two-Fold Operation, and I utilized it in my Wooden Shoe, so I definitely was intrigued. My guess is that it was named after a line from Herman Melville's Moby Dick, "The act of paying is perhaps the most uncomfortable infliction that the two orchard thieves entailed upon us. But being paid – what will compare with it?"
The Two Orchard Thieves snuck in with malty, apple, and cardamom aromas. Next, caramel and apple flavors on the sip made off into a bitter and malty apple and nutty swallow.

Thursday, June 10, 2021

night people

1 1/2 oz Rye Whiskey (Rittenhouse)
3/4 oz Sweet Vermouth (Cocchi)
3/4 oz St. Germain (St. Elder)
2 dash Angostura Bitters
2 dash Peychaud's Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into an old fashioned glass pre-rinsed with Herbsaint, and garnish with a lemon twist.

Two Thursdays ago, I delved back into T. Cole Newton's Cocktail Dive Bar book to make another one of his Sazerac variations called the Night People. Cole created this recipe for a local magazine in honor of Allen Toussaint, and he named it after one of the artist's songs. As a play on Toussaint, he utilized two saints -- St. Germain and Herbsaint. Overall, the recipe minus the Sazerac treatment reminded me of the Citizen's Ideal Manhattan.
The Night People entered in with a lemon, black licorice, and floral aroma. Next, grape and apricot notes on the sip wandered into rye, grape, and grapefruit flavors on the swallow with a clove and anise finish.

Wednesday, June 9, 2021

five point palm exploding heart technique

1 1/2 oz Mezcal (Fidencio)
3/4 oz Punt e Mes
1/2 oz Galliano Ristretto Coffee Liqueur
1 dash Chocolate Bitters (Bittermens Mole)

Stir with ice and strain into a double old fashioned glass; the photo showed a large ice cube and was included in recipes elsewhere, so I added one.
With Punt e Mes in hand, I decided to find another use for it two Wednesdays ago with the Five Point Palm Exploding Heart Technique. The recipe was crafted by Erick Castro at Polite Provisions in San Diego and was published in Imbibe Magazine in 2015 (I was reminded of it via Kindred Cocktails). The name is a reference to a finishing move in Kill Bill: Vol 2, and the movie's fan Wikipedia provided the quote, "Quite simply, the deadliest blow in all of martial arts. He hits you with his fingertips at 5 different pressure points on your body, and then lets you walk away. But once you've taken five steps your heart explodes inside your body and you fall to the floor, dead." In the glass, the effect was more delicious and less deadly with a smoke, vegetal, and roast aroma. Next, grape and caramel-roast notes on the sip led to an attack of smoky mezcal and coffee-herbal flavors on the swallow with a chocolate finish.

Tuesday, June 8, 2021

3, 2, 1 contact!

1 1/4 oz Bourbon (Old Grand-Dad 114°)
1/2 oz Punt e Mes
1/4 oz Grenadine
2 dash Orange Bitters (Angostura Orange)

Stir with ice, strain into an old fashioned glass pre-rinsed with pastis (Herbsaint), and garnish with an orange twist.

Two Tuesdays ago, I replaced my empty bottle of Punt e Mes so I could make a recipe that I had spotted in T. Cole Newton's Cocktail Dive Bar called the 3, 2, 1 Contact! The cocktail was created at Twelve Mile Limit as a signature drink for the birthday event held in honor or one of the regulars named Tung. The party's theme was "3, 2, Tung, Contact!", but Cole thought naming the drink that would be too embarrassing to say ("tongue contact") to the bartender which could effect its sales. Grenadine and Punt e Mes was a curious pairing to me, and it only appears three other times on the blog including the Coup d'État and Rome is Burning, but it was the Sazerac treatment was what sold the idea to me.
The 3, 2, 1, Contact! launched an orange oil and anise aroma to the nose. Next, grape, berry, and orange notes on the sip reached a Bourbon, bitter herbal, and pomegranate swallow with a licorice finish.

Monday, June 7, 2021

sound of silence

2 oz Wild Turkey Rye (Rittenhouse Bonded)
1/2 oz Cynar
1/2 oz Pedro Ximenez Sherry (Oxford 1970)
2 dash Scrappy's Orange Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into an old fashioned glass (I added a large ice cube), and garnish with an orange twist.
Two Mondays ago, I returned to the Community Cocktails book and spotted Mark Sassi's Sound of Silence that he created at the Smith Tower in Seattle; Mark later commented that he is now bartending at Rob Roy. The combination of Cynar, Pedro Ximenez sherry, and orange bitters reminded me of Chad Austin's I Want to Believe, so I was curious to try it with rye instead of rum (and a pinch of salt). Once prepared, the Sound of Silence began with an orange, caramel, and raisin aroma. Next, grape and caramel on the sip transitioned to rye, raisin, and funky herbal flavors on the swallow.

Sunday, June 6, 2021

golden gate

2 oz Dry Gin (Beefeater)
1/2 oz Blanc Vermouth (Dolin)
1/4 oz Yellow Chartreuse
1/4 oz Cynar

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, and garnish with an orange twist.
Two Sundays ago, I recalled a drink that I had spotted in the 2020 Community Cocktails book called the Golden Gate that seemed like it would make a delightful Martini riff. The recipe was crafted by bartender Brennan Sheppard while working at Rob Roy in Seattle. Once prepared, the Golden Gate proffered an orange, juniper, and herbal aroma. Next, honey and white grape notes on the sip crossed over into gin and vegetal herbal flavors on the swallow.

Saturday, June 5, 2021

cameo kirby cocktail

50% Dry Gin (1 oz Beefeater)
50% Dry Vermouth (1 oz Noilly Prat)
2 tsp Raspberry Syrup (1/2 oz)
Juice 1/2 Lime (1/2 oz)

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.
Two Saturdays ago, I opened up the 1933 edition of Jack's Manual and spotted the Cameo Kirby Cocktail named after the 1923 black and white silent film. The recipe reminded me of a Clover Club minus the egg white and with a different citrus and perhaps the Florida minus the bitters and with a different citrus. Once assembled, the Cameo Kirby welcomed the nose with a pine and raspberry bouquet. Next, lime and berry notes on the sip morphed into gin, herbal, and raspberry flavors on the swallow.

Friday, June 4, 2021

variations on a theme

2 oz Hayman's Old Tom Gin
1/2 oz Cherry Heering
+1/4 oz Campari
1/2 tsp Maraschino Liqueur (Luxardo)
2 dash Regan's Orange Bitters (Angostura Orange)

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with an orange twist.

Two Fridays ago, I returned to the Jupiter Disco: Preservation zine and honed in on the Variations on a Theme. This recipe was crafted by Maks Pazuniak at New Orleans' Cure in 2009, and it had the Cherry Heering-Campari duo that he utilized in Arbitrary Nature of Time and the Charlatan. As for the name, Maks described how, "We listened to Om's Variations on a Theme a lot at Cure after work. Or maybe Kirk and I did."
The Variations on a Theme welcomed the senses with an orange and cherry aroma. Next, dark red fruit on the sip transformed into gin, cherry, bitter orange, and nutty flavors on the swallow.

Thursday, June 3, 2021

the undertaker

1 1/2 oz Fighting Cock 103° Bourbon (1 3/4 oz Old Forester 100°) (*)
1/2 oz Grand Marnier (Pierre Ferrand Dry Curaçao)
1/4 oz Cynar
1/2 oz Grapefruit Juice

Shake with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, and garnish with an orange twist.
(*) Most other versions of this recipe call for Eagle Rare. I bumped up the volume slightly to make it a full 3 oz build which would have been the standard at Drink.

Two Thursdays ago, I spied the Undertaker on Kindred Cocktails that was created by Misty Kalkofen then of Drink for the 2009 Grand Marnier & Navan Mixology Summit in Vail, Colorado. The structure reminded me of the Brown Derby, but instead of honey, this had the Cynar-orange liqueur duo that has worked well in drinks like the Educated Lady, Hugo Ball, and Doff Your Hat. In fact, it reminded me of the Bitter End which has gin and grapefruit bitters instead of Bourbon.
I have no evidence that Misty is a wrestling fan, so I assume that it was named in the spirit of the other profession cocktails created at Drink during that time such as the Prosecutor. In the glass, the Undertaker dug up an orange, grapefruit, and Bourbon aroma. Next, grapefruit and orange notes turned over on the sip, and the swallow heaped on Bourbon and funky orange flavors with a grapefruit finish.

Wednesday, June 2, 2021

il teatro

1 oz Fernet Branca
1 oz Cynar
1 oz Bianco Vermouth (Dolin Blanc)

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with a mint leaf.
Two Wednesdays ago, my copy of T. Cole Newton's Cocktail Dive Bar arrived. I initially was lured in by a Punt e Mes recipe, but alas, my bottle needed to be replaced, so I happened on the Il Teatro as a brash substitute. The pairing of equal parts Fernet Branca and Cynar reminded me a little of the Bottecchia but here it was blanc vermouth instead of Campari as the third player. Technically, it should be bianco vermouth since Cole's concept was three Italian ingredients. Once assembled, the Il Teatro met the nose with a mint and menthol bouquet. Next, caramel, white grape, and green herbal notes on the sip opened up to funky vegetal, bitter gentian, and minty flavors on the swallow.

Tuesday, June 1, 2021

cease & desist

2 oz Punt e Mes
1 oz Rittenhouse Rye
1 tsp Fernet Branca

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, and garnish with an orange twist.
Two Tuesdays ago, I returned to the Jupiter Disco: Preservation zine and latched on to the Cease & Desist. The recipe was created by Maks Pazuniak at the Cure in New Orleans in 2009, and the heavy hand with Punt e Mes reminded me of his Charlatan. Once prepared, the Cease & Desist showcased orange, minty, and grape aromas. Next, the Punt e Mes' grape filled the sip, and the swallow rounded things out with rye and bitter herbal flavors with a dry caramel and menthol finish.